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Find out who your team drew in FA Cup third round

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Liverpool will host Everton in the third round of the FA Cup, while Championship leaders Leeds United will travel to Arsenal.

Holders Manchester City will welcome League Two side Port Vale and Manchester United go to Wolves in a repeat of last season’s quarter-final.

National League side AFC Fylde, the lowest ranked team definitely through to the third round, will travel to Premier League Sheffield United.

Ties are played between 3-6 January.

Boston, of the sixth-tier National League North, will host Premier League opposition in Newcastle United, if they can come through a replay against Rochdale on Tuesday, 10 December.

Fellow non-league sides Hartlepool and Eastleigh also face replays, but could meet Oxford United and Barnsley respectively should they progress.

Merseyside rivals Liverpool and Everton meet on Wednesday night in the Premier League, with both sides in wildly differing form.

Jurgen Klopp’s Reds are eight points clear at the top of the league, while Everton sit two points above the relegation zone with pressure mounting on boss Marco Silva.

All three of the most recent meetings between Leeds and Arsenal have come in the third round of the FA Cup, the Gunners winning 1-0 in 2012 and also prevailing 3-1 in a replay in January 2011, following a 1-1 draw.

Wolves reached their first FA Cup semi-final in 21 years by beating Manchester United in last season’s quarters, while Manchester City will be wary of falling victim to lower-league Port Vale after going out to then-League One side Wigan in the fifth round in 2018.

Draw in full

Leicester City v Wigan Athletic

QPR v Swansea City

Fulham v Aston Villa

Chelsea v Nottingham Forest

Wolves v Manchester United

Charlton Athletic v West Brom

Rochdale or Boston United v Newcastle United

Cardiff City v Forest Green Rovers or Carlisle United

Oxford United v Exeter City or Hartlepool United

Sheffield United v AFC Fylde

Southampton v Huddersfield Town

Liverpool v Everton

Bristol City v Shrewsbury Town

Bournemouth v Luton Town

Brighton v Sheffield Wednesday

Bristol Rovers or Plymouth Argyle v Coventry City or Ipswich Town

Eastleigh or Crewe Alexandra v Barnsley

Manchester City v Port Vale

Middlesbrough v Tottenham

Reading v Blackpool

Watford v Tranmere Rovers

Preston v Norwich City

Millwall v Newport County

Crystal Palace v Derby County

Solihull Moors or Rotherham United v Hull City

Brentford v Stoke City

Fleetwood Town v Portsmouth

Arsenal v Leeds United

Gillingham v West Ham United

Burton Albion v Northampton Town

Burnley v Peterborough United

Birmingham City v Blackburn Rovers

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Abdul Deghayes murder trial jury dismissed

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The jury in the murder trial of a man accused of stabbing another man to death in Brighton has failed to reach a verdict.

Abdul Deghayes, the brother of two British teenagers who were killed while fighting in Syria, was stabbed eight times, Hove Crown Court heard.

Daniel Macleod, 36, of Lambeth, London, denies murder, and Stephen Burns, 55, of Brighton, denies assisting him.

The jury was discharged and a retrial has been scheduled for June 2020.

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Election results 2019: Analysis in maps and charts

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Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Conservatives have a majority of 78, with one seat left to declare.

They have won seats in traditional Labour heartlands across northern England and Wales, including Workington, Great Grimsby and Bassetlaw.

In Scotland, the SNP have made gains from all three other parties that held seats there in 2017, most notably taking Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson’s seat of Dunbartonshire East.

The interactive map below shows all the seats that have changed from one party to another. Select the “results” tab to see what has happened in the rest of the UK.

Find a constituency

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If you can’t see the map click here.

The Brexit effect

The Conservatives increased their vote share in many areas that voted Leave in the 2016 EU referendum.

By contrast they lost votes in strong Remain constituencies such as those in Scotland and London. But Labour lost votes in both strong Remain and strong Leave areas.

Strong Leave and strong Remain constituencies are those where an estimated 60% or more of the electorate voted for that option at the EU referendum.

These estimates of constituency Brexit votes were modelled by Professor Chris Hanretty, as the 2016 referendum result was only recorded by local authority and not by Westminster constituency.

The Conservatives were clear winners in constituencies estimated to have voted majority Leave in 2016. They won almost three quarters of all these seats.

By contrast, there was no clear winner among Remain backing constituencies, with a crowded field of parties all winning substantial numbers of seats.

Labour did best of all the parties but only took 40% of the constituencies that backed Remain.

Labour also straddled the Brexit divide taking a roughly equal number of Leave (106) and Remain (96) seats.

Most other parties had a clearer Brexit divide.

The nations and regions

In every nation and region of Britain, the scale of Labour’s losses outweighed any gains made by the Conservatives.

The Conservatives did lose votes in the south of England and Scotland, but these were balanced by gains in the rest of England and Wales.

The Lib Dems increased their share of the vote across the UK, but failed to translate these gains into more seats.

In Scotland, the SNP made 14 gains, and lost just one seat, while the Conservatives lost seven and Labour lost six seats.

In Wales, the Conservatives gained six seats and Labour lost six, mostly in the north east. Overall, Labour’s share of the vote was down to 41% from 49% in 2017.

The Conservatives polled consistently well across England and most of Wales, reflecting their overall 43% share of the UK vote.

You can use the interactive map below to show the vote share for other parties as well as the turnout.

Labour’s strength was concentrated in London and areas around cities in south Wales, the North East and North West. At 32%, Labour’s share of the vote is down around eight points on the 2017 general election.

Overall, they lost 60 seats and gained only one, Putney in London.

More women in Parliament

With one seat to be declared, a total of 220 female MPs have been elected. This is 12 more than the previous high of 208 in 2017.

Turnout, on what was a cold and damp polling day, was 67.3%. slightly lower than the last election in June 2017.

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General election 2019: Only Eastbourne changed hands

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The Conservatives had a good night in the South East.

Several MPs increased their majorities, and the Liberal Democrats lost their only seat in the region to them.

In a gloomy night for Labour, one of the few bright spots was the party holding on to Canterbury, a surprise win in 2017.

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